How to Reload Chunks in Minecraft [Quick Guide]

How to Reload Minecraft ChunksDo you need help reloading chunks in Minecraft? In this guide, we walk you through how to easily reload Minecraft chunks.

Crafting a Minecraft world is mostly a fun endeavor where you get to put together an expansive universe all of your own. Some gamers have been able to craft some amazing builds in Minecraft.

Because of the way the game works, though, sometimes things get a little buggy. Whether it’s due to the size of your map, the quality of your gaming pc, or just dumb luck, sometimes the blocks that you’ve added don’t appear correctly.

This issue is due to the way chunks are loaded into the world.

There’s nothing to worry about when this happens. It doesn’t mean your hard work has been for naught, nor does it mean your game is broken. It simply means you need to reload your chunks to get them looking right again.

Minecraft Chunk
Image taken from Fandom’s Minecraft Wiki.

What are Minecraft Chunks?

Chunks are what form the basis of a Minecraft world and formulate every aspect of it, including the ground, the sky, and the water regions.

They are 16 by 16 blocks in a horizontal space that stretch downwards for 256 blocks, totaling at 65,536. Each time you load into your world, these chunks are loaded within your immediate vicinity.

From there on, the game will render new chunks depending on your draw distance settings.

These foundational blocks will load as you move and traverse across your world.

Why Do Chunks Become Buggy?

Chunks are rendered and de-rendered on a constant basis as you explore the world. They don’t remain in place outside of your character’s field of vision. They also de-render when they are past the draw distance you have set. This enables the game to run at good performance without overloading your device.

Because of how chunks constantly come and go in this manner, it is normal for them to become buggy or cause some issues with your landscape. It’s for this reason that you may want to reload your chunks.

How to Reload Minecraft Chunks on all Platforms

The most common way to reload chunks in Minecraft is to leave the world or server and sign in again. This action will force the chunks to load again and will, hopefully, appear without any bugs or glitches.

This method should be your go-to on all platforms besides the Java version. Console versions don’t offer any commands that allow you to reload chunks, so you’re forced to use exit the world to get your chunks fixed when they become wonky.

How to Reload Chunks in Minecraft Java Edition

The Java version of Minecraft has a nifty way of allowing you to reload chunks. You can still rely on exiting the game and re-entering your world, but the unique method this edition has is far faster.

All you simply need to do to reload chunks in the Java edition is to hold down F3 then press A. You’ll know you did that correctly when you suddenly see your world reloading all around you. Depending on your computer or gaming rig’s specs, it may take a few seconds for this process to complete.

More F3 Commands

The F3 key in the Java edition has a few other handy abilities that you can use to fix up any blemishes or bugs:

Hold F3 and press…

  • S to reload all resources from the web
  • T to reload textures
  • D to clear your chat history
  • F to increase render/draw distance
  • P to turn auto-pause on and off when another window is open
  • H to turn detailed item descriptions on and off
  • B to toggle mob hitboxes
  • G to turn chunk borders in the world on and off
  • N to switch between being a Creator and a Spectator
  • I to copy block and entity data to the clipboard
  • ESC to pause your game without bringing up the menu

How to Reload Chunks in Minecraft Bedrock Edition

Unfortunately, the Bedrock edition of Minecraft doesn’t have the same quick way of reloading chunks. Even on PC, the F3+A method won’t work on this version. You’ll still have to quit the world and re-enter to force your chunks to load again.

What is a Chunk Reset in Minecraft?

While reloading your chunks simply causes them to re-render, resetting removes them in their entirety, including any mods you’ve added. This is a particularly useful method for making significant changes to your world.

One reason could be that your world is too large and is causing performance drops. In this case, biting off a big chunk in one go can help alleviate this issue. Another reason to reset chunks is to add new biomes from updates to the game. For this, you can remove a mass of chunks from one area to add an entirely new biome that you feel fits your landscaping better.

How to Reset Chunks in Minecraft (MCA Selector & Amulet)

Whatever your reasons may be, resetting chunks is possible as long as you have a computer. You’ll need to download a third-party app called MCA Selector, which can be done for the Java editions of the game. For Bedrock, you’ll need to use an app called Amulet. Before you do anything, though, be sure to backup your world folder. It can be found under %appdata% within the .minecraft folder.

After installing MCA Selector, you can open your world within the app to start resetting chunks. Select File -> Open region, then navigate to the location of your world’s folder under AppData. Now, you’ll need to open the segment you want to edit.

Your entire main world is located under the region folder. The Nether and End are under DIM-1 and DIM1, respectively. Once you open your world, you’ll see it appear in the grid of MCA Selector. Each square of this grid represents a chunk.

Selecting them turns them orange, and you can choose as many as you want before resetting them. Once you’re happy with your selection, click on the Selection menu item, then select Delete selected chunks. The squares will have now become black. Now all you need to do is load back into the world, and those chunks will have loaded in their basic state.

The process is different when using Amulet, and you can learn more by watching the video below:

How to Reset Chunks in Minecraft World with Amulet

 

Yannis Vatis

Yannis is a veteran gamer with over 30 years of experience playing a wide spectrum of video games. When not writing about games, he's playing them, and if he's not playing them then he's definitely thinking about them.

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